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Egor Fedoseev
Egor Fedoseev

Transfer Case Ford Bronco 1988 !!INSTALL!!


Zumbrota transfer cases are remanufactured using strict specifications to ensure a quality build, and to give you peace of mind when reselling to a customer or installing in a vehicle. All units are put through a proprietary cleaning method, and arrive to your door looking like new. We only ship after a complete inspection, component replacement, and quality control process. Each transfer case unit is signed off once approved by a member of our rebuild team. Zumbrota products are built to the highest quality standards of precision and reliability.




transfer case ford bronco 1988



Looking for information on transfer cases found in fullsize Ford trucks? This page is dedicated to those cases and provides a list of vehicles, a list of cases that were found in them, and photos for reference.


The Ford Dana 20 transfer case is gear driven with a cast iron case. It was used in early Broncos from 1966 until 1977 and it was used in some Ford pickups. It is drivers drop and it was available with a couple different low range ratios.


>Why you want it: One of the burliest transfer cases ever built. Made with both right- and left hand outputs, and divorced versions. It is heavy-duty, geardriven, and relatively easy to find. The 205 is available in six different versions.


Choosing the correct Ford transfer case fluid is critical for the service life and operation of your full-size 4x4 truck. Over the years, lubricant specifications and service requirements have changed which can make choosing the correct type of fluid for Ford transfer case by type difficult. This is especially true with Ford as the latest version of MerconV Fluid is NOT approved for use in 4x4 Transfer Cases. We have compiled the handy Ford transfer case fluid chart below to help you select the correct transfer case fluid for your Ford 4x4. For later model years, the transfer case fluids are VERY specific. Do NOT USE generic fluids in these transfer cases!!!! For older transfer cases, you can upgrade to newer synthetic base fluids, but you should rebuild or at least replace the old seals as additives in synthetic fluids may not be compatible with old seals. The following Chart was compiled using OEM Factory Shop Manuals and MOTOR Specification Guides. While we have made every effort to present accurate information, the information in this chart in no way supersedes or replaces the recommendations in your Ford OEM Owners Manual, Shop Manual, or other official Ford publication or specification list.


*Ford Gear Drive Transfer Case 1959-1977: Many Ford Shop Manuals will List SAE 50 Engine Oil for use in temperatures Above 10F and SAE 30 Engine Oil for use in below 10F. Very early manuals ALSO give the option of using SAE 90 weight mineral oil WITHOUT extreme pressure additives Above 10F and SAE 80 Mineral Oil without EP additives for use below 10F. Single viscosity SAE 50 and SAE 30 motor oils are still readily available, but finding straight mineral gear oil today might be difficult. Dana 20, Dana 21, Dana 24, and NP205 gear drive transfer cases have some latitude for alternate fluids, but we recommend you stick as close as possible to the original Ford fluid requirements.


**1974-1979 NP203 Full-Time Transfer Case: The NP203 Full Time, Chain Drive Transfer Case MUST have engine oil for a lubricant. For the 1974-1977 model years, Ford lists SAE 50 Engine Oil for use in temperatures above 10F and SAE 30 Engine Oil for use below 10F. For 1978 and 1979, Ford specifies Ford D8DZ-19C547-A Standard Transmission Lube for all Bronco and F150-F250-F350 transfer cases including the NP203. Ford specification is ESP-M2C83-C. In 1992, D8DZ19C547A was replaced by F2ZZ-19C547-A SAE 80w Manual Transmission Fluid which was later replaced by XT-4-QGL 75w90 GL-4 Conventional Gear Lube (Ford Specification WSS-M2C203-A1) AND XT-M5-QS 75w90 Full Synthetic Manual Transmission Fluid (Ford Specification WSS-M2C200-C). We had a lot of experience with NP203 transfer cases in the 1970s and 1980s and our experience was any fluid other than lighter engine oils would cause bearing problems and/or chain stretch issues. Both Dodge and GM also used the NP203 Transfer Case and both specified 10w30 Engine Oil. Since Ford is not claiming the newer manual transmission fluids are backward compatible with 1978-1979 NP203 transfer cases (and we do not think they are), we recommend you stick with Original Equipment recommended engine oils for your Ford NP203. Ford transmission fluid supersession Information is current as of July 2017.


***1978-1979 NP205 Part Time Transfer Case: For 1978 and 1979, Ford specifies Ford D8DZ-19C547-A Standard Transmission Lube for all Bronco and F150-F250-F350 transfer cases including the NP205. Ford specification is ESP-M2C83-C. In 1992, D8DZ19C547A was replaced by F2ZZ-19C547-A SAE 80w Manual Transmission Fluid which was later replaced by XT-4-QGL 75w90 GL-4 Conventional Gear Lube (Ford Specification WSS-M2C203-A1) AND XT-M5-QS 75w90 Full Synthetic Manual Transmission Fluid (Ford Specification WSS-M2C200-C). Unlike the NP203 chain drive transfer case, the NP205 gear drive transfer case is pretty tolerant of different fluids as diverse as Dexron ATF (used in GM NP205 1980-1991) and SAE 140w Gear Lube (used in Dodge NP205 above 90F). Ford does not claim XT-4-QGL or XT-M5-QS is backward compatible with the 1978-1979 NP205, but while we recommend you use the same SAE 50 engine oil as Ford specified for the 1973-1979 NP205, we would not be afraid to use XT-4-QGL 75w90 Gear Lube or XT-M5-QS 75w90 Full Synthetic Manual Transmission Fluid in a Ford NP205 that had new seals (original seals may not be compatible with newer oil base stocks and additives).


****For the 1980 to 1987 model years, Ford recommended Dexron II Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) for 4x4 Transfer Cases. Dexron II was replaced by Dexron III. For the 1987-1996 (Bronco, F150 and 1988-1997 (F250, F350) model years, Ford originally specified Mercon. Mercon has now been superseded by Mercon V which is NOT recommended for use in 4x4 transfer cases. Both Dexron II/Dexron III and Mercon fluid are listed in Ford Shop Manuals as meeting the same Ford specification XT-2-QDX. Until mid-2018, Ford specified synthetic base Motorcraft XL-12 Transfer Case Fluid for use in chain drive transfer cases that originally used Dexron II or Mercon, however, since that time Ford has superseded XL-12 with Mercon LV. As of May 2019, an old Motorcraft web page still lists Mercon LV as Not For Use in Transfer Cases, but the most recent LV page specifically states LV is now for all transfer cases. We are not aware of any lubrication-related issues with using either Mercon LV or Dexron III in NP208F, BW1345, BW1356, or BW4407 transfer cases in the 1980-1997 era Ford 4x4s.


*****For the 1997-2007 Model Years, most Ford Factory Shop Manuals list Mercon as the recommended transfer case fluid. Ford introduced Mercon ATF in 1987 and Mercon is the recommended fluid for most 1997 to 2007 4x4 Ford transfer cases. Mercon was superseded by Mercon V which is NOT recommended for use in transfer cases so Ford was recommending XL-12 for use in 1997-2007 transfer cases which has been replaced by Mercon LV. As of May 2019, an old Motorcraft web page still lists Mercon LV as Not For Use in Transfer Cases, but the most recent LV page specifically states LV is now for all transfer cases.


To simplify production, all examples were sold with four-wheel drive; a shift-on the-fly Dana 20 transfer case and locking hubs were standard.[11] The rear axle was a Ford 9-inch axle, with Hotchkiss drive and leaf springs; the front axle was a Dana 30, replaced by a Dana 44 in 1971.[11] In contrast to the Twin I-Beams of larger Ford trucks, the Bronco used radius arms to locate the coil-sprung front axle, along with a lateral track bar, allowing for a 34-foot turning circle, long wheel travel, and antidive geometry (useful for snowplowing). A heavier-duty suspension system was an option, along with air front springs.[11]


To lower production costs, at its launch, the Bronco was offered solely with a three-speed, column-shifted manual transmission and floor-mounted transfer case shifter (with a floor-mounted transmission shifter later becoming a popular modification).[11] In 1973, in response to buyer demand, a three-speed automatic transmission was offered as an option.[11]


In the interest of safety, rear-wheel anti-lock brakes (ABS) became standard for the 1987 model.[31][28] As an option, push-button control was introduced for the four-wheel drive system for 1987.[28][32] For 1988, skid plates for the transfer case became standard equipment.[28]


Transfer cases are aptly named in that their function is to transfer power from the transmission output shaft, to the differentials. This function could be considered like a splitter for the transmission because the transfer case accepts the single shaft from the transmission and distributes power from that shaft to two individual driveshafts. There is much more, however, since the transfer case on modern vehicles can change the amount of power sent to the front and rear wheels, and many transfer cases are able to electronically shift from four-wheel drive to two-wheel drive.


As the transmission output shaft spins, splines on that shaft are turning the input shaft for the transfer case. That provides rotational power to the transfer case, which is then distributed to the output shaft by one of two sets of gears. One set of gears will drive only the rear wheels, and the other set of gears will drive only the front wheels. The rear wheels will always be connected, so the switching will only lock in the front wheels. Transfer cases have a locking function as well, and this allows the front and rear wheels to turn at the same speed regardless of the load on each wheel. Again, there is more, since many transfer cases have two speeds - hi and lo. These are typically selected electronically through a transfer case shift motor the same as four-wheel or two-wheel drive is selected. Modern transfer cases have the added benefit of torque vectoring. This function allows a percentage of power from the transmission to be sent to the front or rear wheels on demand.


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